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  • Smart leaders know that today’s pressures for change don’t come at you one at a time—they come all at once, from all directions. As we try to respond to these overlapping, never-ending changes, the data suggest that we fail more often than we succeed. Can we do better? Yes, but we need to take a radically different approach. This session offers a four-part model that allows leaders to deal with multiple changes simultaneously without drowning in the churn. For each stage of the process, you will receive detailed guidance, practical tools, and real-world examples needed to navigate change the way it happens now.

  • This paper is the first in a series to be jointly released by Pearson and P21 entitled, “Skills for Today.” Each paper summarizes what is currently known about teaching and assessing one of the Four Cs: collaboration, critical thinking, creativity, and communication. Our partnership on this series signifies a commitment to helping educators, policy-makers, and employers understand how best to support students in developing the skills needed to succeed in college, career, and life.

  • Culture eats strategy. The best strategies don’t survive in a culture that doesn’t support change, newness, and innovation. While the strategic plan, organization chart and employee manual may tell you how things are supposed to happen, culture is what determines what really happens. This webinar will address the key aspects of developing a culture of innovation so that new products, services, and offerings can be encouraged, nurtured, and launched without being stripped of their value and novelty.

  • This paper is the second in a series to be jointly released by Pearson and P21 entitled, “Skills for Today.” Each paper summarizes what is currently known about teaching and assessing one of the Four Cs: collaboration, critical thinking, creativity, and communication. Our partnership on this series signifies a commitment to helping educators, policy-makers, and employers understand how best to support students in developing the skills needed to succeed in college, career, and life.

  • This paper is the third in a series to be jointly released by Pearson and P21 entitled, “Skills for Today.” Each paper summarizes what is currently known about teaching and assessing one of the Four Cs: collaboration, critical thinking, creativity, and communication. Our partnership on this series signifies a commitment to helping educators, policy-makers, and employers understand how best to support students in developing the skills needed to succeed in college, career, and life.

  • Successful operational leadership is a different skill than innovation leadership. Yet they’re both critical for successful organizations. The ability to lead innovation is what creates growth opportunities for the organization, and this involves working with so-called “creatives” as well as anyone responsible for figuring out how to improve the organization’s top line, bottom line and/or impact. Innovation is about launching something new that adds value, and that usually requires you to work with a team. To do this requires a change in the status quo and a fresh approach to leadership.

  • This paper is the fourth in a series to be jointly released by Pearson and P21 entitled, “Skills for Today.” Each paper summarizes what is currently known about teaching and assessing one of the four Cs: collaboration, critical thinking, creativity, and communication. Our partnership on this series signifies a commitment to helping educators, policy-makers, and employers understand how best to support students in developing the skills needed to succeed in college, career, and life.

  • How does an appetite for innovation correlate with digital maturity? One might expect digitally mature organizations to be more experimental than others, but surprisingly the gap between the most and least mature companies is not nearly as large as one might expect. Our data shows that companies across maturity levels experiment in digital business. A far bigger differentiator, however, is what companies do with the results of those experiments. Mature companies are far more likely to scale them to drive change across the enterprise.

  • An approach to digital transformation that's mostly tactical and not cohesive, companywide or focused will prove ineffective, according to the report. Renovating business technology is also crucial for attracting and retaining talent and will prove challenging if new tools aren't implemented.

  • A one-size-fits-all approach to innovation leadership doesn’t create a sustainable culture of innovation. Trying to run the business while also trying to do innovation is difficult. Driving successful innovation through your organization is tougher than crafting the new concept. What’s required to make innovation repeatable is a differentiated set of competencies at each level of leadership in the organization. This session will focus on the skills needed to drive innovation, whether you’re a sole contributor, the CEO or anything in between.

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